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Date Ref. Title Section Type Download Info Summary Related Documents Translated versions
05/10/2016 2016/1438 ESMA consults on product governance guidelines to safeguard investors , Press Release PDF
152.24 KB
13/07/2016 2016/1126 ESMA consults on proposed central clearing delay for small financial counterparties , Press Release PDF
132.06 KB
19/12/2017 ESMA71-99-916 ESMA consults on securitisation requirements , Press Release PDF
150.34 KB
13/07/2018 ESMA71-99-1005 ESMA consults on tick size regime PR , Press Release PDF
149.16 KB
28/05/2019 ESMA71-99-1159 ESMA consults on tiering comparable compliance and fees under EMIR 2.2 , Press Release PDF
89.98 KB
23/07/2015 2015/1193 ESMA consults on UCITS remuneration guidelines , Press Release PDF
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The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has launched a consultation on proposed Guidelines on sound remuneration policies under the UCITS V Directive and AIFMD. The Directive includes rules that UCITS must comply with when establishing and applying a remuneration policy for certain staff categories and the proposed UCITS Remuneration Guidelines further clarify the Directive’s provisions. The proposed Guidelines aim to ensure a convergent application of the remuneration provisions and will provide guidance on issues such as proportionality, governance of remuneration, requirements on risk alignment and disclosure. The final Guidelines will apply to UCITS management companies and national competent authorities.
03/04/2018 ESMA71-99-958 ESMA continues to focus on convergence in enforcement of IFRS across the EU , , Press Release PDF
154.53 KB
20/12/2019 ESMA71-99-1256 ESMA CRAs TRs thematic fees report , , Press Release PDF
101.41 KB
18/10/2018 ESMA71-99-1027 ESMA data analysis values EU derivatives market at €660 trillion with central clearing increasing significantly , Press Release PDF
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11/07/2014 2014/819 ESMA defines central clearing of interest rate and credit default swaps Press Release PDF
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The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has launched a first round of consultations to prepare for central clearing of OTC derivatives within the European Union. The two consultation papers seek stakeholders’ views on draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) for the clearing of Interest Rate Swaps (IRS) and Credit Default Swaps (CDS) that ESMA has to develop under the European Markets Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR). With the overarching objective of reducing systemic risk, EMIR introduces the obligation to clear certain classes of OTC derivatives in central clearing houses (CCPs) that have been authorised (European CCPs) or recognised (third-country CCPs) under its framework. To ensure that the clearing obligation reduces systemic risk, EMIR specifies a process for the identification of the classes of OTC derivatives that should be subject to mandatory clearing. This includes the assessment of specific criteria that the relevant classes of OTC derivatives have to meet. ESMA is required to draft RTS on the clearing obligation within six months of the authorisation or recognition of CCPs. ESMA has analysed the classes from several CCP notifications and has determined that some IRS and CDS classes should be subject to the clearing obligation. Following the difference in timing of the corresponding CCP authorisations, the IRS and CDS classes are covered in two separate papers and consultation periods, with a large overlap between the two to give the opportunity to stakeholders to review them and provide feedback at the same time. These two consultation papers may be followed by one or more on other asset classes.Basis, fixed-to-float, forward rate agreements and overnight index swaps to be centrally cleared Regarding IRS, ESMA’s draft RTS propose the following four classes, on a range of currencies and underlying indices, to be subject to central clearing: •    Basis swaps;•    Fixed-to-float interest rate swaps; •    Forward rate agreements; and•    Overnight index swaps. European untranched index CDS to be centrally cleared Regarding CDS, ESMA’s draft RTS proposes European untranched Index CDS (for two indices) to be subject to central clearing.Draft standards built on swaps already offered for clearing ESMA defined the IRS and CDS classes to be subject to central clearing following an analysis of all IRS and CDS classes which are currently offered for clearing by European CCPs. In addition, for equity and interest rate futures and options which are offered for clearing, ESMA decided that a clearing obligation is not necessary at this stage. Next steps The IRS Consultation Paper is open for feedback until 18 August 2014 and the CDS Consultation Paper until 18 September 2014. ESMA will use the answers received to draft its final RTSs on the clearing obligation for IRS and CDS and send them for endorsement to the European Commission. The clearing obligation will take effect following a phased implementation, with the current proposal ranging from six months to three years after the entry into force of the RTS, depending on the types of counterparties concerned.
27/09/2012 2012/606 ESMA defines standards for derivatives and CCPs Press Release PDF
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09/01/2018 ESMA71-99-925 ESMA Double Volume Cap delay , Press Release PDF
216.16 KB
18/11/2013 2013/1661 ESMA finalises clearing and risk mitigation obligations for non-EU OTC derivatives Press Release PDF
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ESMA finalises clearing and risk mitigation obligations for non-EU OTC derivatives The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has issued final draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) related to derivative transactions by non-European Union (EU) counterparties. The RTS implement provisions of the Regulation on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories (EMIR). EMIR provisions regarding central clearing and risk mitigation techniques also apply to those OTC derivatives entered into by two non-EU counterparties which have a direct, substantial and foreseeable impact on EU financial markets. Ensuring that risks posed to the EU’s financial markets by non-EU transactions are addressed by regulation and supervision is key in ensuring safer markets. ESMA’s draft RTS clarify that OTC derivative contracts entered into by two counterparties established in one or more non-EU countries, for which a decision on equivalence of the jurisdiction’s regulatory regime has not been adopted, will be subject to EMIR where one of the following conditions are met: • One of the two non-EU counterparties to the OTC derivative contract is guaranteed by an EU financial for a total gross notional amount of at least €8bn, and for an amount of at least 5% of the OTC derivatives exposures of the EU financial guarantor; or • The two non-EU counterparties execute their transactions via their EU branches and would qualify as financial counterparty if established in the EU. ESMA’s draft RTS will cover OTC derivative contracts concluded after the date the RTS becomes applicable. Non-evasion clause The draft RTS also specify cases of transactions aimed at evading EMIR’s regulatory requirements, which would be the case for derivatives contracts or arrangements concluded without any business substance or economic justification, and in a way to circumvent the clearing obligation and risk mitigation provisions. Next steps ESMA’s draft RTS have been submitted for endorsement to the European Commission on 15 November 2013. The Commission has three months to decide whether to endorse the final draft RTS and must then submit the endorsed RTS to the European Parliament and the Council. Notes for Editors 1. 2013/1657 - Draft technical standards under EMIR on contracts with a direct, substantial and foreseeable effect within the Union and non-evasion. 2. Regulation (EU) No.648/2012 on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories. 3. ESMA is an independent EU Authority that was established on 1 January 2011 and works closely with the other European Supervisory Authorities responsible for banking (EBA), and insurance and occupational pensions (EIOPA), and the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB). 4. ESMA’s mission is to enhance the protection of investors and promote stable and well-functioning financial markets in the European Union (EU). As an independent institution, ESMA achieves this aim by building a single rule book for EU financial markets and ensuring its consistent application across the EU. ESMA contributes to the regulation of financial services firms with a pan-European reach, either through direct supervision or through the active co-ordination of national supervisory activity. Press Release 2013/1661 Final Report 2013/1657
04/12/2012 2012/801 ESMA finalises guidelines on repo arrangements for UCITS funds , Press Release PDF
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Date: 04 December 2012ESMA/2012/801PRESS RELEASEESMA finalises guidelines on repo arrangements for UCITS fundsThe European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has today published its final guidelines on repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements for UCITS funds.  The guidelines state that UCITS should only enter into such agreements if they are able to recall at any time any assets or the full amount of cash.Key elements of the guidelines are:•    For repurchase arrangements, UCITS should be able to recall at any time the assets subject to such arrangements; •    For reverse repurchase agreements, UCITS should be able to recall at any time the full amount of cash on either an accrued or a mark-to-market basis.  However, when cash is recalled on a mark-to-market basis, the mark-to-market value of the reverse repurchase agreements should be used for the calculation of the net asset value of the UCITS; and•    ESMA considers fixed-term repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements that do not exceed seven days as arrangements that allow the assets to be recalled at any time by the UCITS.The guidelines will now be translated into all EU languages and will be incorporated into ESMA’s Guidelines on ETFs and other UCITS issues, published in July 2012.  The full set of guidelines will enter into force two months after the publication of the translations.  This will result in a comprehensive framework for UCITS that will increase transparency and investor protection and contributes to safeguarding the stability of financial markets. Notes for editors1.    ESMA is an independent EU Authority that was established on 1 January 2011 and works closely with the other European Supervisory Authorities responsible for banking (EBA), and insurance and occupational pensions (EIOPA), and the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB).2.    ESMA’s mission is to enhance the protection of investors and promote stable and well-functioning financial markets in the European Union (EU).  As an independent institution, ESMA achieves this aim by building a single rule book for EU financial markets and ensuring its consistent application across the EU.  ESMA contributes to the regulation of financial services firms with a pan-European reach, either through direct supervision or through the active co-ordination of national supervisory activity.Further information:David CliffeSenior Communications Officer Tel:   +33 (0)1 58 36 43 24 Mob: +33 6 42 48 29 06Email: press@esma.europa.eu
15/11/2016 2016/1577 ESMA finalises Guidelines on the validation and review of Credit Rating Agencies’ methodologies , Press Release PDF
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18/07/2013 2013/992 ESMA finalises supervisory co-operation agreements for alternative investment , , Press Release PDF
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19/02/2020 ESMA71-99-1284 ESMA finds continued high risks as financial markets remain highly volatile , Press Release PDF
94.61 KB
24/05/2012 2012/330 ESMA finds high level of consistency in EU national regulators’ practices for the approval of investment prospectuses , Press Release PDF
177.71 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has published today “Prospectus Directive – Good Practices in the approval process“,  a peer review report on the application of regulatory good practices by national supervisory authorities - competent authorities (CA)  when approving investment prospectuses.The review was conducted using good practice criteria that ESMA developed on selected areas of the Prospectus Directive dealing with the approval process for investment prospectuses.  The prospectuses provide investors with easy to understand and relevant information on investment products.  Peer review reports on national regulators’ procedures contribute to ESMA’s objective of fostering supervisory convergence and achieving a level playing field between jurisdictions.
07/04/2016 2016/582 ESMA finds room for improvement in national supervision of investment advice to retail clients , , Press Release PDF
107.49 KB
31/03/2016 2016/468 ESMA fines DTCC Derivatives Repository Limited €64,000 for data access failures , Press Release PDF
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ESMA fines DTCC Derivatives Repository Limited €64,000 for data access failures

The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has fined the trade repository DTCC Derivatives Repository Limited (DDRL) €64,000, and issued a public notice, for negligently failing to put in place systems capable of providing regulators with direct and immediate access to derivatives trading data. This is a key requirement under the European Markets and Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) in order to improve transparency and facilitate the monitoring of systemic risks in derivatives markets.

This is the first time ESMA has taken enforcement action against a trade repository registered in the European Union (EU). DDRL is the largest EU registered trade repository.

ESMA found that DDRL failed to provide direct and immediate access to derivatives data from 21 March 2014 to 15 December 2014, a period of about nine months in which access delays increased from two days to 62 days after reporting and affected 2.6 billion reports. This was due to its negligence in:

  • failing to put in place data processing systems that were capable of providing regulators with direct and immediate access to reported data;
  • failing, once they became aware, to inform ESMA in a timely manner of the delays that were occurring; and
  • taking three months to establish an effective remedial action plan even while delays were worsening.

DDRL’s failures caused delays to regulators accessing data, revealed systemic weaknesses in its organisation particularly its procedures, management systems or internal controls and negatively impacted the quality of the data it maintained.