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Date Ref. Title Section Type Download Info Summary Related Documents Translated versions
11/06/2014 ESMA/WP/1 ESMA Working Paper- Monitoring the European CDS market through networks: Implications for contagion risks Reference PDF
1005.17 KB
Based on a unique data set referencing exposures on single name credit default swaps (CDS) on European reference entities, we study the structure and the topology of the European CDS market and its evolution from 2008 to 2012, resorting to network analysis. The structural features revealed show bilateral CDS exposures describing growing scale-free networks whose highly interconnected hubs constitute both a strength and weakness for the stability of the system. The potential “super spreaders” of financial contagion, identified as the most interconnected participants, consist mostly of banks. For some of them net notional exposures may be particularly large relative to their total common equity. Our findings also point to the importance of some non-dealer/non-bank participants belonging to the shadow banking system.
11/06/2014 ESMA/WP/2 ESMA Working Paper- The systemic dimension of hedge fund illiquidity and prime brokerage Reference PDF
839.63 KB
We analyse the potentially vulnerable and systemically relevant financial intermediation chain established by hedge funds and prime brokers. Our dataset covers the 306 largest global hedge funds and their prime brokers over the period July 2001 to December 2011. The study illustrates that hedge funds and prime brokers act as complementary trading partners in normal times. However, we observe that this form of financial intermediation may be severely impaired in times of market distress. This can be explained by the hoarding of liquid securities by prime brokers who are eager to avert runs by their clients.
15/01/2015 ESMA/WP/2015/1 ESMA Working Paper- Real-world and risk-neutral probabilities in the regulation on the transparency of structured products Reference PDF
480.24 KB
The price of derivatives (and hence of structured products) can be calculated as the discounted value of expected future payoffs, assuming standard hypotheses on frictionless and complete markets and on the type of stochastic processes for the price of the underlying. However, the probabilities used in the pricing process do not represent “real” probabilities of future events, because they are based on the assumption that market participants are risk-neutral. This paper reviews the relevant mathematical finance literature, and clarifies that the risk-neutrality hypothesis is acceptable for pricing, but not to forecast the future value of an asset. Therefore, we argue that regulatory initiatives that mandate intermediaries to give retail investors information on the probability that, at a future date, the value of a derivative will be higher or lower than a given threshold (so-called “probability scenarios”) should explicitly reference probabilities that take into account the risk premium (so-called “real-world” probabilities). We also argue that, though probability scenarios may look appealing to foster investor protection, their practical implementation, if based on the right economic approach, raises significant regulatory and enforcement problems.
25/09/2018 ESMA22-106-1189 CEMA GEA- Application form Reference DOCX
33.95 KB
25/09/2018 ESMA22-106-1190 Call for expressions of interest: Group of Economic Advisers for ESMA’s Committee for Economic and Markets Analysis Reference PDF
284.27 KB
02/12/2019 esma31-62-1193 List of prospectus thresholds , , Reference PDF
221.54 KB
04/12/2017 ESMA31-69-163 Call for expressions of interest for the Consultative Working Group of ESMA’s Corporate Finance Standing Committee (CFSC) , Reference PDF
275.59 KB
04/12/2017 ESMA31-69-163 FORM Application form for CFSC CWG , Reference DOCX
34.73 KB
27/03/2020 ESMA31-69-261 Call for expression of interest CFSC CWG 2020 Reference PDF
133.21 KB
27/03/2020 ESMA31-69-263 Application form CSFC CWG Reference DOCX
40.09 KB
07/02/2017 ESMA50-1121423017-286 ESMA Risk Assessment Work Programme 2017 Reference PDF
422.57 KB
07/02/2019 ESMA50-157-1588 ESMA Risk Assessment Work Programme 2019 , , Reference PDF
465.58 KB
18/05/2018 ESMA50-157-956 CEMA Terms of Reference Reference PDF
194.67 KB
23/12/2019 ESMA50-164-2969 Alternative Investment Funds (AIFs) exposures to commercial real estate- 2018 , Reference PDF
146.79 KB
28/11/2019 ESMA50-165-1009 ESMA Risk Dashboard No. 4 2019 Reference PDF
593.2 KB
19/02/2020 ESMA50-165-1041 ESMA TRV No 1 2020 Annex Reference PDF
1.54 MB
20/03/2017 ESMA50-165-287 ESMA Risk Dashboard No. 1, 2017 Reference PDF
923.68 KB
19/10/2017 ESMA50-165-421 EU derivatives markets ─ a first-time overview , , , Reference PDF
477.35 KB
06/11/2017 ESMA50-165-422 The impact of charges on mutual fund returns- correction , , Reference PDF
590.09 KB

ERRATUM - In the original version of this document published on 19 October 2017 in table V.3 on page 4, the values in the last four rows of column five were accidentally misreported. For this reason, ESMA now provides a corrected version, including the corrected values and a footnote pointing to the initial mistake.

ESMA carried out a first analysis on fund performance measures, developing initial metrics to analyse the impact of ongoing fees, one-off charges and inflation on the returns of mutual funds. Key preliminary results for the EU fund industry show: Substantial reduction in net returns available to investors, especially in the retail sector and weakly cost- or price-sensitive investment decisions by retail investors

On average ongoing fees and one-off charges and inflation-reduced returns available to investors by 29% of gross returns between 2013 and 2015. These reductions apply to all market segments, while varying across jurisdictions, asset classes and client types. Relative return reductions range from 11% for passive equity fund shares to 44% for retail fund shares in bond mutual funds. Relative and absolute return reductions for actively managed and retail fund shares tend to exceed those of passively managed and institutional fund shares. Despite the impact of fees and charges on the net outcome to investors, these do not seem to be reflected in investor choices.

10/09/2019 ESMA50-165-875 ESMA report on trends, risks and vulnerabilities no.2 2019- statistical annex Reference PDF
1.39 MB