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16/02/2012 2012/95 Draft Technical Standards for the Regulation on OTC Derivatives, CCPs and Trade Repositories Consultation Paper PDF
776.04 KB
The Regulation of the European Parliament and Council on OTC Derivatives, CCPs and trade repositories (EMIR) introduces provisions to improve transparency and reduce the risks associated with the OTC derivatives market and establishes common rules for central counterparties (CCPs) and for trade repositories (TRs).  It has been identified that common rules are required in the case of CCPs in view of the shift of risk management from a bilateral to a central process for OTC derivatives and in the case of trade repositories because of the increase in information that needs to be reported to them. The Regulation delegates or confers powers to the Commission to adopt regulatory technical standards (RTS) and implementing technical standards (ITS) on a number of areas. This discussion paper covers the draft RTS and ITS which ESMA is required to develop. Following this discussion paper and on the basis of the relevant input received, ESMA will prepare draft technical standards to be included in the consultation paper which will most likely be published around summer 2012.
25/06/2012 2012/379 Draft Technical Standards for the Regulation on OTC Derivatives, CCPs and Trade Repositories Consultation Paper PDF
2.12 MB

This consultation paper includes the Regulatory and Implementing Technical Standards ESMA is required to draft under the Regulation of the European Parliament and Council on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories (EMIR). It covers implementing measures for the application of the clearing obligation for risk mitigation techniques, exemptions for non-financial counterparties and intra-group transactions, requirements for CCPs and reporting and disclosure obligations for trade repositories. 

18/11/2013 2013/1657 Draft technical standards under EMIR on contracts with a direct, substantial and foreseeable effect within the Union and non-evasion Technical Standards PDF
394.75 KB

The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has issued final draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) related to derivative transactions by non-European Union (EU) counterparties. The RTS implement provisions of the Regulation on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories (EMIR).

14/04/2014 JC/CP/2014/03 EBA, ESMA and EIOPA consultation paper on draft technical standards under EMIR Consultation Paper PDF
1.11 MB
 
17/10/2019 ESMA42-111-4895 EMIR data quality peer review , Report PDF
862.01 KB
13/08/2015 2015/1251 EMIR Review Report no.1- Review on the use of OTC derivatives by non-financial counterparties Final Report PDF
3.03 MB
13/08/2015 2015/1252 EMIR Review Report no.2- Review on the efficiency of margining requirements to limit procyclicality Final Report PDF
3.93 MB
13/08/2015 2015/1253 EMIR Review Report no.3- Review on the segregation and portability requirements Final Report PDF
267.55 KB
13/08/2015 2015/1254 EMIR Review Report no.4- ESMA input as part of the Commission consultation on the EMIR Review Final Report PDF
399.85 KB
19/11/2015 2015/1750 EMIR statement re bank guarantees energy market Statement PDF
111.67 KB
04/11/2015 EMIR VT EMIR validation table Reference XLSX
26.48 KB
13/05/2013 804587 EMIR – Draft standard on the cross-border application of EMIR, (Art. 4(4) and 11(14)) Letter PDF
157.5 KB
27/03/2013 2013/428 EMIR: A Fair Price for Safety and Transparency , Speech PDF
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EMIR: A Fair Price for Safety and Transparency - speech by Steven Maijoor, ESMA Chair, at the EMIR conference in the Hague

23/02/2017 ESMA70-708036281-185 ESAs communication on variation margin exchange under the EMIR RTS on OTC derivatives Statement PDF
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05/05/2015 JC/2015/02 ESAs- main risks to EU financial market stability have intensified , , Press Release PDF
125.34 KB
The Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) published its fifth Report on Risks and Vulnerabilities in the EU Financial System. Overall, the report found that in the past six months, risks affecting the EU financial system have not changed in substance, but have further intensified. The EU’s economic performance improved slightly in early 2015, however the financial sector in general continues to be affected by a combination of factors such as low investment demand, economic uncertainty in the Eurozone and its neighbouring countries, a global economic slow-down and a low-interest rate environment. The main risks affecting the financial system remain broadly unchanged from those identified in the report’s previous edition, but have become more entrenched. The major risks include: • Low growth, low inflation, volatile asset prices and their consequences for financial entities; • Search for yield behaviour exacerbated by potential rebounds; • Deterioration in the conduct of business; and • Increased concern about IT risks and cyber-attacks. Despite these risks, a number of ongoing policy and regulatory initiatives are contributing to improving the stability and confidence in the financial system as well as facilitating additional funding channels to the real economy. These include ongoing regulatory reforms in the securities, banking and insurance sectors such as the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID II) and Regulation (MiFIR), the work on the implementation of the Capital Requirements Directive and Regulation (CRDIV/CRR), the work on the Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive (BRRD), the Deposit-Guarantee Schemes Directive (DGS) and the Solvency II Directive, as well as the European Commission’s plan for a Capital Markets Union (CMU). Steven Maijoor, Chair of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the current Chairman of the Joint Committee, said: “The Joint Committee has noted some improvement in overall market conditions; however, the recovery is not yet sustained and is exposed to risks related to broad macroeconomic conditions, in particular the low interest environment and resulting search-for-yield behaviour. Additionally regulators continue to have concerns about the operational risks generated by some financial institutions’ inappropriate business conduct, as well as those risks posed by inadequate management of IT risks. “However, recent regulatory initiatives across the banking, insurance and securities sectors, such as the Comprehensive Assessment, the insurance sector stress test and Solvency II along with, the ongoing MiFID, EMIR and PRIPS reforms are contributing to improving the stability and confidence in the EU financial system." Key Risks Identified The identified risks in the Report can be divided into macro risks to the EU financial system and economy and operational risks. Macro Risks The key macro risks identified relate to: 1. Risks from weak economic growth and low inflation environment, which include: • Adverse effect that low interest rates and uncertainties about the economic recovery have had on the outlook for the financial industry; • Higher valuation and market liquidity risk has raised concerns about the outlook for financial entities’ stability in the event of reversals in interest rates and asset prices; 2. Low profitability is motivating financial institutions and other investors to search for yield, which requires increased supervisory attention to the viability of business models, related restructuring activity and adequate management of risks. However, the promotion of sound and innovative business models for market-based funding structures could help to deliver additional stimulus; and 3. Some continued doubts on the comparability and consistency of banks’ calculations of risk weighted assets. Operational Risks The key operational risks relate to: 4. Business conduct risk remains a key concern with the Report recommending that supervisors should include misconduct costs in future stress tests where appropriate, while financial institutions should strengthening product oversight and governance frameworks. Further improvements in the regulatory framework and supervisory practices to address conduct risks are also warranted. In addition, further progress needs to be made on benchmark reforms where continuity and integrity remain a source of concern even if key panels remained stable; and 5. IT operational risk and cyber risk remain of great concern and pose challenges to the the safety and integrity of financial institutions. IT risk increased due to costs pressures, outsourcing, the need for additional capacities and a mounting number of cyber-attacks. The adequate integration of IT risk into overall risk management is a key policy for mitigation.
12/07/2013 2013/936 ESMA begins detailing central clearing of OTC derivatives Press Release PDF
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The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has launched a Discussion Paper to prepare the regulatory technical standards (RTS) which will implement provisions of the European Markets Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) regarding the obligation to centrally clear OTC derivatives. The consultation is aimed at assisting ESMA in developing its approach to determining which classes of OTC derivatives need to be centrally cleared and the phase-in periods for the counterparties concerned. EMIR introduced provisions to improve transparency, establish common rules for central counterparties (CCPs) and for trade repositories (TRs) and to reduce the risks associated with the OTC derivatives market. It provides for the obligation to centrally clear OTC derivative contracts or to apply risk mitigation techniques such as the exchange of collateral.
30/09/2016 2016/1411 ESMA consults on future reporting rules for securities financing transactions , , Press Release PDF
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The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has issued today a consultation paper on draft technical standards implementing the Securities Financing Transaction Regulation (SFTR), which aims to increase the transparency of shadow banking activities. Securities financing transactions (SFTs) are transactions where securities are used to borrow cash (or other higher investment-grade securities), or vice versa – this includes repurchase transactions, securities lending and sell/buy-back transactions.

28/05/2019 ESMA71-99-1159 ESMA consults on tiering comparable compliance and fees under EMIR 2.2 , Press Release PDF
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11/07/2014 2014/819 ESMA defines central clearing of interest rate and credit default swaps Press Release PDF
94.55 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has launched a first round of consultations to prepare for central clearing of OTC derivatives within the European Union. The two consultation papers seek stakeholders’ views on draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) for the clearing of Interest Rate Swaps (IRS) and Credit Default Swaps (CDS) that ESMA has to develop under the European Markets Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR). With the overarching objective of reducing systemic risk, EMIR introduces the obligation to clear certain classes of OTC derivatives in central clearing houses (CCPs) that have been authorised (European CCPs) or recognised (third-country CCPs) under its framework. To ensure that the clearing obligation reduces systemic risk, EMIR specifies a process for the identification of the classes of OTC derivatives that should be subject to mandatory clearing. This includes the assessment of specific criteria that the relevant classes of OTC derivatives have to meet. ESMA is required to draft RTS on the clearing obligation within six months of the authorisation or recognition of CCPs. ESMA has analysed the classes from several CCP notifications and has determined that some IRS and CDS classes should be subject to the clearing obligation. Following the difference in timing of the corresponding CCP authorisations, the IRS and CDS classes are covered in two separate papers and consultation periods, with a large overlap between the two to give the opportunity to stakeholders to review them and provide feedback at the same time. These two consultation papers may be followed by one or more on other asset classes.Basis, fixed-to-float, forward rate agreements and overnight index swaps to be centrally cleared Regarding IRS, ESMA’s draft RTS propose the following four classes, on a range of currencies and underlying indices, to be subject to central clearing: •    Basis swaps;•    Fixed-to-float interest rate swaps; •    Forward rate agreements; and•    Overnight index swaps. European untranched index CDS to be centrally cleared Regarding CDS, ESMA’s draft RTS proposes European untranched Index CDS (for two indices) to be subject to central clearing.Draft standards built on swaps already offered for clearing ESMA defined the IRS and CDS classes to be subject to central clearing following an analysis of all IRS and CDS classes which are currently offered for clearing by European CCPs. In addition, for equity and interest rate futures and options which are offered for clearing, ESMA decided that a clearing obligation is not necessary at this stage. Next steps The IRS Consultation Paper is open for feedback until 18 August 2014 and the CDS Consultation Paper until 18 September 2014. ESMA will use the answers received to draft its final RTSs on the clearing obligation for IRS and CDS and send them for endorsement to the European Commission. The clearing obligation will take effect following a phased implementation, with the current proposal ranging from six months to three years after the entry into force of the RTS, depending on the types of counterparties concerned.
18/11/2013 2013/1661 ESMA finalises clearing and risk mitigation obligations for non-EU OTC derivatives Press Release PDF
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ESMA finalises clearing and risk mitigation obligations for non-EU OTC derivatives The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has issued final draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) related to derivative transactions by non-European Union (EU) counterparties. The RTS implement provisions of the Regulation on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories (EMIR). EMIR provisions regarding central clearing and risk mitigation techniques also apply to those OTC derivatives entered into by two non-EU counterparties which have a direct, substantial and foreseeable impact on EU financial markets. Ensuring that risks posed to the EU’s financial markets by non-EU transactions are addressed by regulation and supervision is key in ensuring safer markets. ESMA’s draft RTS clarify that OTC derivative contracts entered into by two counterparties established in one or more non-EU countries, for which a decision on equivalence of the jurisdiction’s regulatory regime has not been adopted, will be subject to EMIR where one of the following conditions are met: • One of the two non-EU counterparties to the OTC derivative contract is guaranteed by an EU financial for a total gross notional amount of at least €8bn, and for an amount of at least 5% of the OTC derivatives exposures of the EU financial guarantor; or • The two non-EU counterparties execute their transactions via their EU branches and would qualify as financial counterparty if established in the EU. ESMA’s draft RTS will cover OTC derivative contracts concluded after the date the RTS becomes applicable. Non-evasion clause The draft RTS also specify cases of transactions aimed at evading EMIR’s regulatory requirements, which would be the case for derivatives contracts or arrangements concluded without any business substance or economic justification, and in a way to circumvent the clearing obligation and risk mitigation provisions. Next steps ESMA’s draft RTS have been submitted for endorsement to the European Commission on 15 November 2013. The Commission has three months to decide whether to endorse the final draft RTS and must then submit the endorsed RTS to the European Parliament and the Council. Notes for Editors 1. 2013/1657 - Draft technical standards under EMIR on contracts with a direct, substantial and foreseeable effect within the Union and non-evasion. 2. Regulation (EU) No.648/2012 on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories. 3. ESMA is an independent EU Authority that was established on 1 January 2011 and works closely with the other European Supervisory Authorities responsible for banking (EBA), and insurance and occupational pensions (EIOPA), and the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB). 4. ESMA’s mission is to enhance the protection of investors and promote stable and well-functioning financial markets in the European Union (EU). As an independent institution, ESMA achieves this aim by building a single rule book for EU financial markets and ensuring its consistent application across the EU. ESMA contributes to the regulation of financial services firms with a pan-European reach, either through direct supervision or through the active co-ordination of national supervisory activity. Press Release 2013/1661 Final Report 2013/1657