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11/04/2012 JC/2011/96 EBA, ESMA and EIOPA’s Report on the legal, regulatory and supervisory implementation across EU Member States in relation to the Beneficial Owners Customer Due Diligence requirements under the Third Money Laundering Directive [2005/60/EC] Final Report PDF
552.11 KB
11/04/2012 JC/2011/97 EBA, ESMA and EIOPA’s Report on the legal and regulatory provisions and supervisory expectations across EU Member States of Simplified Due Diligence requirements where the customers are credit and financial institutions under the Third Money Laundering Di Final Report PDF
476.47 KB
07/12/2012 JC/2012/86 ESA report on the application of AML/CTF obligations to, and the AML/CTF supervision of e-money issuers, agents and distributors in Europe. Final Report PDF
476.42 KB
12/04/2013 JC 2013-010 Joint Committee report on risks and vulnerabilities in the EU financial system, March 2013 Final Report PDF
694.8 KB
The Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (Joint Committee) has published today its first Report on Risks and Vulnerabilities in the European Union’s (EU) Financial System. The European financial system faces a range of risks and challenges: 1. Risks from the weak macroeconomic outlook for the financial health of real-economy and sovereign borrowers, and consequently for financial institutions’ asset quality and profitability; 2. Risks of a prolonged period of low interest rates impacting insurers and pension funds, increasing search for yield behaviour and facilitating widespread forbearance by banks; 3. Risks of further fragmentation of the single market in financial services due to evidences of national retrenchment, home bias, reduced cross-border activity and clustering of markets; 4. Risks from increased reliance on collateral in financial transactions; 5. Risks to confidence in financial institutions balance sheet valuations and risk disclosures; and 6. Risks of loss of confidence in financial market benchmarks. These risks, although presented individually in this report, are highly interlinked and require a concerted response by policy makers both at the political level and from the European System of Financial Supervision including the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs). Suggested policy actions to restore the confidence in the financial system are presented at the end of some described risks. The challenge facing policy makers is nothing less than to restore the confidence and trust in the financial system that has been eroded during recent years’ financial crises.
18/07/2013 2013/998 Guidelines on the model MoU concerning consultation, cooperation and the exchange of information related to the supervision of AIFMD entities , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
245.15 KB

ESMA finalises supervisory co-operation agreements for alternative investment funds The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has approved seven co-operation arrangements between EU securities regulators and their global counterparts with responsibility for the supervision of alternative investment funds, including hedge funds, private equity and real estate funds. ESMA’s Board of Supervisors, at its July meeting, approved Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) with authorities from the Bahamas, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico and the United States, including the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). ESMA has now negotiated 38 agreements on behalf of the 31 EU/EEA national competent authorities for securities markets supervision. The co-operation agreements allow for the exchange of information, cross-border on-site visits and mutual assistance in the enforcement of respective supervisory laws. ESMA had approved 31 MoUs with other non-EU regulators in May. The agreements cover third-country alternative investment fund managers (AIFMs) that market alternative investment funds (AIFs) in the EU and EU AIFMs that manage or market AIFs outside the EU. The agreements also cover co-operation in the cross-border supervision of depositaries and AIFMs’ delegates. National securities regulators in the EU, as the supervisors of AIFMs, are in the process of signing MoUs with those jurisdictions relevant to their market. The existence of co-operation arrangements between the EU and non-EU authorities is a precondition of the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (AIFMD) for allowing managers from third countries access to EU markets or to perform fund management by delegation from EU managers by 22 July 2013. The co-operation arrangements are applicable from 22 July, and will enable cross-border marketing of AIFs to professional investors between jurisdictions. This is subject to the non-EU jurisdiction not being listed as a non-cooperative jurisdiction by the Financial Action Task Force and, as from the entry into force of the passport for non-EU managers, having co-operation agreements in place with EU Member States regarding the exchange of information on tax matters. The content of the ESMA MoUs follow the IOSCO Principles on Cross-Border Supervisory Co-operation of 2010, and complements the terms and conditions of the IOSCO Multilateral MoU Concerning Consultation and Co-operation and the Exchange of Information of 2002 (MMoU). ESMA had originally contacted all the authorities that have signed the IOSCO MMoU of 2002. ESMA has now approved MoUs with those 42 authorities that responded to ESMA’s call. ESMA continues to negotiate the MoU with the Chinese authority.   Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) MoU with AFSA (Albania) MoU with ASIC (Australia) MoU with BMA (Bermuda) MoU with Canadian authorities  Accompanying letter MoU with CDVM (Morocco) MoU with CFTC (US) Accompanying letter MoU with CIMA (Cayman Islands) MoU with CMA (Kenya) MoU with CMSA (Tanzania) MoU with CNBV (Mexico) MoU with CVM (Brazil) MoU with DFSA (Dubai) MoU with FCSM (Mauritius) MoU with FINMA (Switzerland) MoU with FSA (Labuan) MoU with FSC (BVI) MoU with FSC (Guernsey) MoU with FSC (Isle of Man) MoU with FSC (Jersey) MoU with HKMA (Hong Kong) MoU with ISA (Israel) MoU with JFSA (Japan) MoU with MAFF (Japan) MoU with MAS (Singapore) MoU with METI (Japan) MoU with OCC and FED (US) MoU with OSFI (Canada) MoU with SC (Malaysia) MoU with SC (Republic of Srpska) MoU with SC (The Bahamas) MoU with SCA (UAE) MoU with SEBI (India) MoU with SEC (Montenegro) MoU with SEC (Pakistan) MoU with SEC (Thailand) MoU with SEC Macedonia (FYROM) MoU with SFC (Hong Kong) MoU with US SEC Accompanying letter   MoU with EFSA (Egypt)   MoU with FMA (New Zealand)   MoU with FSB (South Africa)   MoU with SSC (Vietnam)   MoU with FSC and FSS (South Korea)

05/09/2013 JC 2013/050 Joint Committee report on risks and vulnerabilities in the EU financial system, August 2013 Final Report PDF
793.91 KB
08/10/2013 JC 2013/055 Identification of Financial Conglomerates Final Report PDF
268.59 KB
The Joint Committee publishes the 2013 List of Identified Financial Conglomerates. The latest version of the list shows 75 financial conglomerates with the head of group in an EU/EEA country, one with the head of group in Australia, two with the head of the group in Switzerland, and two with the head of group in the United States.
08/10/2013 JC 2013/056 Explanation of Changes in Compilation of Data Final Report PDF
93.28 KB
The Joint Committee publishes the 2013 List of Identified Financial Conglomerates. The latest version of the list shows 75 financial conglomerates with the head of group in an EU/EEA country, one with the head of group in Australia, two with the head of the group in Switzerland, and two with the head of group in the United States.
08/11/2013 JC-2013-72 Preliminary report on anti-money laundering and counter financing of terrorism Risk Based Supervision Final Report PDF
636.21 KB
28/11/2013 JC 2013/77 Joint Position of the European Supervisory Authorities on Manufacturers’ Product Oversight & Governance Processes Final Report PDF
210.59 KB
The Joint Committee of the three European Supervisory Authorities published today eight principles applicable to the oversight and governance processes of financial products. These principles cover in particular the responsibilities of manufacturers and producers in setting up processes, functions and strategies for designing and marketing financial products, as well as at reviewing the products’ life cycle. The Joint Position of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) highlights in particular that the design of financial products and services poses risks to consumers when the target market is not correctly identified. These risks can also arise when the objectives and characteristics of the target market are not duly taken into account in the marketing of products to consumers. These issues have previously arisen at EU level across the three sectors of banking, insurance and securities.The eight high level principles developed by the three ESAs in their Joint Position stress the importance of the controls that manufacturers should put in place before launching their products, thus discouraging products and services that may cause consumer detriment from entering the market and thus ultimately enhancing consumers’ confidence in financial markets.The Joint Position is not directly addressed to market participants and competent authorities but it will provide a high-level, consistent basis for the development of more detailed principles addressed to manufactures by each ESA in the respective sectors. The Joint position is therefore without prejudice to any work that is being developed by each ESA, including in the context of the review of sectoral Directives.
18/12/2013 ESA/2013/035 Joint Opinion-Review on the functioning of the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB) Opinion PDF
142.63 KB
Joint Opinion-Review on the functioning of the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB)
06/02/2014 JC 2014/004 Mechanistic references to credit ratings in the ESAs’ guidelines and recommendations Final Report PDF
519.98 KB
The Joint Committee of the three European Supervisory Authorities (EBA, ESMA and EIOPA - ESAs) published today its final Report on mechanistic references to credit ratings in the ESAs’ guidelines and recommendations and on the definition of “sole and mechanistic reliance” on such ratings. In accordance with the Credit Rating Agencies Regulation (CRA 3), the EBA, ESMA and EIOPA have reviewed all their existing guidelines and recommendations in order to identify, and where appropriate remove, references to external credit ratings that could trigger sole or mechanistic reliance on such ratings. This final report includes the amendments to ESMA’s Guidelines on Money Market Funds (MMF) according to the definition of ‘sole and mechanistic reliance’ contained therein. This common definition aims at harmonising the different interpretations of ‘sole and mechanistic reliance’ in the ESAs regulations and guidelines. This definition, to which the ESAs intend to refer to in all their future guidelines, recommendations and draft technical standards, was developed taking into account all the comments received during the public consultation that ended on 5 December 2013. Legal background Regulation (EU) No 462/2013 of 21 may 2013 (CRA 3) mandates the EBA, EIOPA and ESMA to review and, where appropriate, remove all references to credit ratings in existing guidelines and recommendations that have the potential to trigger sole or mechanistic reliance. This article puts forward the first of the Principles for reducing reliance on CRA Ratings issued by the Financial Stability Board on 27 October 2010.
02/04/2014 JC/2014/18 Report on risks and vulnerabilities in the EU financial system March 2014 Final Report PDF
1.28 MB
13/06/2014 JC/2014/43 Joint Committee Final Report on guidelines for complaints-handling for the securities (ESMA) and banking (EBA) sectors , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
312.66 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European Banking Authority (EBA) published today their Joint Committee final Report on guidelines for handling consumer complaints in the securities and banking sectors. The document aims to increase market confidence and for the benefit of consumers and firms alike it will ensure a harmonised approach to handling complaints for all 28 EU Member States and across all financial services sectors.The final report published today is part of the efforts of the European Supervisory Authorities to bring further supervisory convergence across the securities and banking sectors. It was developed on the basis of the existing complaints-handling guidelines established by EIOPA (the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority) for the insurance sector. The report was launched for a public consultation last year and this final version takes into consideration the feedback received.ESMA and the EBA consider that these guidelines will ensure a consistent approach to complaints-handling across the EU. Consumers can purchase financial services and products in the investment, banking and insurance sectors across the entire EU Single Market and these guidelines will allow them to refer to a single set of complaints-handling arrangements. EU consumers will therefore be able to rely on the same approach irrespective of what type of product they have purchased and where they have purchased it.In addition to strengthening consumer protection -a key statutory objective for ESMA and for the EBA-, the guidelines will also allow firms, some of which sell products from more than one sector across the EU, to streamline and standardise their own complaints-handling arrangements. National regulators too will be able to supervise the same harmonised requirements across all sectors of financial services in their own jurisdictions.The guidelines will be translated into the official languages of the European Union (EU) and they will become applicable two months after the date of publication of their translations.
31/07/2014 JC/2014/062 Placement of financial instruments with depositors, retail investors and policy holders ('Self placement') Final Report PDF
383.93 KB
Reminder to credit institutions and insurance undertakings about applicable regulatory requirements Executive summary As part of their respective mandates to protect investors, depositors and policy holders, the three European Supervisory Authorities, the EBA, ESMA and EIOPA are concerned about the practices used by some financial institutions to comply with enhanced prudential requirements under the CRD/R IV, the pending BRRD, and Solvency 2, as well as the ongoing EBA stress test and the ECB’s comprehensive assessment. These practices include financial institutions selling to their own client base financial instruments that they themselves have issued and that are eligible to comply with the above requirements. This practice may breach a number of rules governing the conduct of these institutions. However, the ‘loss bearing’ features of many of these products mean that consumers are exposed to significant risks that do not exist for other financial instruments. For example, investors are more likely to be subject to bail-in; and the absence of harmonised structures, trigger points and loss absorption makes it difficult for investors to understand and compare the products. Each product needs to be assessed as a unique offering, which may be particularly challenging for retail investors. The three authorities, within their remits, are reminding financial institutions that capitalisation pressures should not affect their ability to comply with existing and future requirements applicable in the European Union for the provision of services to consumers, including investors, depositors and policy holders. It is expected that due to regulatory and market developments, the risks of consumer detriment described here will further increase; this reminder is aimed at preventing this.
25/08/2014 JC/2014/43 bg Насоки относно разглеждането на жалби за сектора на ценните книжа (ESMA) и за банковия сектор (EБО) , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
176.25 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European Banking Authority (EBA) published today their Joint Committee final Report on guidelines for handling consumer complaints in the securities and banking sectors. The document aims to increase market confidence and for the benefit of consumers and firms alike it will ensure a harmonised approach to handling complaints for all 28 EU Member States and across all financial services sectors.The final report published today is part of the efforts of the European Supervisory Authorities to bring further supervisory convergence across the securities and banking sectors. It was developed on the basis of the existing complaints-handling guidelines established by EIOPA (the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority) for the insurance sector. The report was launched for a public consultation last year and this final version takes into consideration the feedback received.ESMA and the EBA consider that these guidelines will ensure a consistent approach to complaints-handling across the EU. Consumers can purchase financial services and products in the investment, banking and insurance sectors across the entire EU Single Market and these guidelines will allow them to refer to a single set of complaints-handling arrangements. EU consumers will therefore be able to rely on the same approach irrespective of what type of product they have purchased and where they have purchased it.In addition to strengthening consumer protection -a key statutory objective for ESMA and for the EBA-, the guidelines will also allow firms, some of which sell products from more than one sector across the EU, to streamline and standardise their own complaints-handling arrangements. National regulators too will be able to supervise the same harmonised requirements across all sectors of financial services in their own jurisdictions.The guidelines will be translated into the official languages of the European Union (EU) and they will become applicable two months after the date of publication of their translations.
25/08/2014 JC/2014/43 cs Obecné pokyny k vyřizování stížností pro odvětví cenných papírů (ESMA) a bankovnictví (EBA) , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
154.2 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European Banking Authority (EBA) published today their Joint Committee final Report on guidelines for handling consumer complaints in the securities and banking sectors. The document aims to increase market confidence and for the benefit of consumers and firms alike it will ensure a harmonised approach to handling complaints for all 28 EU Member States and across all financial services sectors.The final report published today is part of the efforts of the European Supervisory Authorities to bring further supervisory convergence across the securities and banking sectors. It was developed on the basis of the existing complaints-handling guidelines established by EIOPA (the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority) for the insurance sector. The report was launched for a public consultation last year and this final version takes into consideration the feedback received.ESMA and the EBA consider that these guidelines will ensure a consistent approach to complaints-handling across the EU. Consumers can purchase financial services and products in the investment, banking and insurance sectors across the entire EU Single Market and these guidelines will allow them to refer to a single set of complaints-handling arrangements. EU consumers will therefore be able to rely on the same approach irrespective of what type of product they have purchased and where they have purchased it.In addition to strengthening consumer protection -a key statutory objective for ESMA and for the EBA-, the guidelines will also allow firms, some of which sell products from more than one sector across the EU, to streamline and standardise their own complaints-handling arrangements. National regulators too will be able to supervise the same harmonised requirements across all sectors of financial services in their own jurisdictions.The guidelines will be translated into the official languages of the European Union (EU) and they will become applicable two months after the date of publication of their translations.
25/08/2014 JC/2014/43 hr Smjernice za rješavanje pritužbi/prigovora za sektore vrijednosnih papira (ESMA) i bankarstva (EBA) , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
153.52 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European Banking Authority (EBA) published today their Joint Committee final Report on guidelines for handling consumer complaints in the securities and banking sectors. The document aims to increase market confidence and for the benefit of consumers and firms alike it will ensure a harmonised approach to handling complaints for all 28 EU Member States and across all financial services sectors.The final report published today is part of the efforts of the European Supervisory Authorities to bring further supervisory convergence across the securities and banking sectors. It was developed on the basis of the existing complaints-handling guidelines established by EIOPA (the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority) for the insurance sector. The report was launched for a public consultation last year and this final version takes into consideration the feedback received.ESMA and the EBA consider that these guidelines will ensure a consistent approach to complaints-handling across the EU. Consumers can purchase financial services and products in the investment, banking and insurance sectors across the entire EU Single Market and these guidelines will allow them to refer to a single set of complaints-handling arrangements. EU consumers will therefore be able to rely on the same approach irrespective of what type of product they have purchased and where they have purchased it.In addition to strengthening consumer protection -a key statutory objective for ESMA and for the EBA-, the guidelines will also allow firms, some of which sell products from more than one sector across the EU, to streamline and standardise their own complaints-handling arrangements. National regulators too will be able to supervise the same harmonised requirements across all sectors of financial services in their own jurisdictions.The guidelines will be translated into the official languages of the European Union (EU) and they will become applicable two months after the date of publication of their translations.
25/08/2014 JC/2014/43 da Retningslinjer for klagebehandling i værdipapirsektoren (ESMA) og banksektoren (EBA) , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
157.05 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European Banking Authority (EBA) published today their Joint Committee final Report on guidelines for handling consumer complaints in the securities and banking sectors. The document aims to increase market confidence and for the benefit of consumers and firms alike it will ensure a harmonised approach to handling complaints for all 28 EU Member States and across all financial services sectors.The final report published today is part of the efforts of the European Supervisory Authorities to bring further supervisory convergence across the securities and banking sectors. It was developed on the basis of the existing complaints-handling guidelines established by EIOPA (the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority) for the insurance sector. The report was launched for a public consultation last year and this final version takes into consideration the feedback received.ESMA and the EBA consider that these guidelines will ensure a consistent approach to complaints-handling across the EU. Consumers can purchase financial services and products in the investment, banking and insurance sectors across the entire EU Single Market and these guidelines will allow them to refer to a single set of complaints-handling arrangements. EU consumers will therefore be able to rely on the same approach irrespective of what type of product they have purchased and where they have purchased it.In addition to strengthening consumer protection -a key statutory objective for ESMA and for the EBA-, the guidelines will also allow firms, some of which sell products from more than one sector across the EU, to streamline and standardise their own complaints-handling arrangements. National regulators too will be able to supervise the same harmonised requirements across all sectors of financial services in their own jurisdictions.The guidelines will be translated into the official languages of the European Union (EU) and they will become applicable two months after the date of publication of their translations.
25/08/2014 JC/2014/43 nl Richtsnoeren voor de behandeling van klachten door de effectensector (ESMA) en de bankensector (EBA) , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
156.05 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European Banking Authority (EBA) published today their Joint Committee final Report on guidelines for handling consumer complaints in the securities and banking sectors. The document aims to increase market confidence and for the benefit of consumers and firms alike it will ensure a harmonised approach to handling complaints for all 28 EU Member States and across all financial services sectors.The final report published today is part of the efforts of the European Supervisory Authorities to bring further supervisory convergence across the securities and banking sectors. It was developed on the basis of the existing complaints-handling guidelines established by EIOPA (the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority) for the insurance sector. The report was launched for a public consultation last year and this final version takes into consideration the feedback received.ESMA and the EBA consider that these guidelines will ensure a consistent approach to complaints-handling across the EU. Consumers can purchase financial services and products in the investment, banking and insurance sectors across the entire EU Single Market and these guidelines will allow them to refer to a single set of complaints-handling arrangements. EU consumers will therefore be able to rely on the same approach irrespective of what type of product they have purchased and where they have purchased it.In addition to strengthening consumer protection -a key statutory objective for ESMA and for the EBA-, the guidelines will also allow firms, some of which sell products from more than one sector across the EU, to streamline and standardise their own complaints-handling arrangements. National regulators too will be able to supervise the same harmonised requirements across all sectors of financial services in their own jurisdictions.The guidelines will be translated into the official languages of the European Union (EU) and they will become applicable two months after the date of publication of their translations.

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