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Date Ref. Title Section Type Download Info Summary Related Documents Translated versions
25/09/2000 00-064c The regulation of Alternative Trading Systems in Europe. A paper for the EU Commission Final Report PDF
84.28 KB
Alternative Trading Systems (ATS) offer electronic securities trading facilities outside the traditional trading channels. An expert group chaired by Howard Davies, Chairman of the UK FSA, has studied the impact of such systems in depth. The group has prepared a comprehensive report identifying and assessing the benefits and risks associated with the emergence of ATS and analysing the current regulatory treatment of such systems, within Europe and elsewhere. The report proposes both a short term and a long term option for a harmonised regulatory treatment of such systems in Europe.The paper was submitted to the European Commission as FESCO"s contribution to the preparation of the forthcoming Green Paper on possible amendments to the Investment Services Directive. The Green Paper will shortly be published as a basis for consultation with Member States, the financial services industry and other interested parties. However, the FESCO paper noted that, while the Green Paper on the ISD might be the catalyst for a far-reaching review of the regulatory approach to ATS, it would not provide a short-term solution. Accordingly, FESCO proposed that the short-term solution should take the form of a set of additional regulatory requirements for ATS operating as investment firms.FESCO will be working on proposals for what those additional regulatory requirements might be over the next six months, with a view to producing a consultation paper in the first half of 2001. This consultation paper will provide an opportunity for interested parties to comment in detail on the FESCO proposals. If, however, in the meantime interested parties have any specific comments on the possible additional regulatory requirements identified in paragraph 71 of the September paper, they should make these known to the Secretariat of FESCO via the following e-mail address: fdankers@europefesco.org
11/01/2013 EBA/BS/2013/002 Report on the administration and management of Euribor Final Report PDF
832.36 KB
14/02/2013 2013/212 Trends, Risks and Vulnerabilities report Final Report PDF
2.03 MB
14/02/2013 2013/213 ESMA Risk Dashboard No.1, 2013 Final Report PDF
717.92 KB
06/06/2013 2013/658 Final Report- ESMA-EBA Principles for Benchmark-Setting Processes in the EU Final Report PDF
620.19 KB
10/06/2013 2013/712 ESMA Risk Dashboard No.2, 2013 Final Report PDF
806.84 KB
03/07/2013 2013/326 Retailisation in the EU Final Report PDF
976.31 KB
20/09/2013 2013/1139 ESMA Risk Dashboard No.3, 2013 Final Report PDF
891.55 KB
20/09/2013 2013/1138 Trends, Risks, Vulnerabilities No. 2, 2013 Final Report PDF
2.92 MB
15/11/2013 2013/1454 ESMA Risk Dashboard No.4, 2013 Final Report PDF
1.12 MB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) is publishing its Risk Dashboard No.4 for 2013. The Risk Dashboard provides a snapshot of risk issues in the third quarter of 2013 and covers the following areas: Economic environment and securities markets conditions; Liquidity Risk; Market Risk; Contagion Risk; and Credit Risk.
12/03/2014 2014/197 ESMA Risk Dashboard No.1, 2014 Final Report PDF
743.09 KB
12/03/2014 2014/188 Trends, Risks, Vulnerabilities No. 1, 2014 Final Report PDF
2.33 MB
27/03/2014 2014/332 Structured Retail Products- Good practices for product governance arrangements , Opinion PDF
203.1 KB
Legal basis 1.    Regulation (EU) No 1095/2010 (ESMA Regulation)  sets out the European Securities and Markets Authority’s (ESMA) scope of action, tasks and powers which include “enhancing customer protection”, and “foster[ing] investor protection”.  2.    In order to continue delivering on this investor protection statutory objective, ESMA is issuing this opinion on certain aspects linked to the manufacturing and distribution of structured retail products (SRP). This opinion takes into account relevant work done in this field both at European and interna-tional level.  3.    This opinion is without prejudice to the requirements for the provision of investment services and activities established in the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID)  and its implementing measures (notably, Directive 2006/73/EC), the regulatory developments arising from the MiFID review or existing product rules that may apply to SRPs.  4.    ESMA’s competence to deliver an opinion is based on Article 29(1) (a) of the ESMA Regulation. In accordance with Article 44(1) of the ESMA Regulation, the Board of Supervisors has adopted this opinion. Background 5.    In its July 2013 report on ‘Retailisation in the EU’ , ESMA highlighted that, from a consumer protec-tion perspective, retail investors may face difficulties in understanding the drivers of risks and returns of structured products. If retail investors do not properly understand the risk and reward profile of structured products, and if the products are not properly assessed against the risk appetite of retail investors, retail investors might be exposed to unexpected losses and this might lead to complaints, reputational risks for manufacturers and distributors, and a loss of confidence in the regulatory framework and, more broadly, in financial markets. 6.    In 2013, ESMA mapped the measures adopted in the EU Member States in relation to complex products in order to identify issues and to better understand the rationale behind national initiatives (by looking at similarities and differences in the various approaches, and reviewing how complexity has been treated in the different EU Members States). 7.    As a result, ESMA has developed a broad set of non-exhaustive examples of good practices, attached as Annex 1 hereto, illustrating arrangements that firms - taking into account the nature, scale and complexity of their business - could put in place to improve their ability to deliver on investor protection regarding, in particular, (i) the complexity of the SRPs they manufacture or distribute, (ii) the nature and range of the investment services and activities undertaken in the course of that business, and (iii) the type of investors they target. These good practices should also be a helpful tool for competent authorities in carrying out their supervisory action. Opinion 8.    ESMA considers that sound product governance arrangements are fundamental for investor protec-tion purposes, and can reduce the need for product intervention actions by competent authorities. 9.    ESMA considers that, when supervising firms manufacturing or distributing an SRP, competent authorities should promote, in their supervisory approaches, the examples of good practices for firms set out in Annex 1 hereto. 10.    Although the good practices set out in Annex 1 hereto focus on structured products sold to retail investors, ESMA considers that they may also be a relevant reference for other types of financial in-struments (such as asset-backed securities, or contingent convertible bonds), as well as when financial instruments are being sold to professional clients. 11.    The exposure to risk is an intrinsic feature of investment products. The good practices set out in Annex 1 refer to product governance arrangements and do not (and cannot) aim at removing investment risk from products.
16/05/2014 2014/536 ESMA Risk Dashboard No.2, 2014 Final Report PDF
782.65 KB
03/09/2014 2014/884 Report on Trends Risks Vulnerabilities No. 2, 2014 Final Report PDF
2.5 MB
03/09/2014 2014/883 ESMA Risk Dashboard No. 3, 2014 Final Report PDF
763.54 KB
22/09/2014 JC/2014/063 Joint Committee Report on Risks and Vulnerabilities in the EU Financial System , Final Report PDF
507.84 KB
The Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) published today its bi-annual report on risks and vulnerabilities in the European Union's (EU) financial system. The report identifies a number of risks to financial stability in the EU, including prolonged weak economic growth in an environment characterised by high indebtedness, intensified search for yield in a protracted low interest rate environment, and uncertainties in global emerging market economies. The report also highlights risks related to conduct of business and Information Technologies (IT).
14/11/2014 2014/1341 ESMA Risk Dashboard No. 4, 2014 Final Report PDF
766.77 KB
The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has today published its Risk dashboard for the third quarter of 2014. ESMA’s Risk Dashboard assess the risks associated to European financial markets looking into liquidity, market, contagion and credit risks. The Dashboard finds that in 3Q14 EU systemic stress indicators increased, after experiencing a calm 2Q14. Contagion risk augmented and liquidity and market risk remained on high levels, with potential for further increases ahead. Credit risk receded though remaining at a high level. Overall, market sentiment continued to be at odds with sluggish economic fundamentals and guarded expectations. An environment of ultra-low interest rates supported markets and preserved the current hunt-for-yield behaviour of investors. However, markets recognised resulting new balance sheet risks, as risk spreads increased, equity valuation moderated and expectations for future short-term interest rates fanned out. Due to these offsetting forces liquidity risk and market risk remained stable, preserving the risk of critical market corrections for the future. The systemic impact of such corrections could be exacerbated by liquidity bottlenecks, such as might arise from structural factors such as thin dealer markets or rising collateral requirements.
17/12/2014 ECO-2014/1 ESMA's Economic Report No 1, 2014- High-frequency trading activity in EU equity markets Final Report PDF
1.87 MB
18/12/2014 2014/1378 Opinion- Investment-based crowdfunding Opinion PDF
460.92 KB
Crowdfunding is a means of raising finance for projects from ‘the crowd’ often by means of an internet-based platform through which project owners ‘pitch’ their idea to potential backers, who are typically not professional investors.  It takes many forms, not all of which involve the potential for a financial return.  ESMA’s focus is on crowdfunding which involves investment, as distinct from donation, non-monetary reward or loan agreement.  Crowdfunding is relatively young and business models are evolving. EU financial services rules were not designed with the industry in mind. Within investment-based crowdfunding a range of different operational structures are used so it is not straightforward to map crowdfunding platforms’ activities to those regulated under EU legislation. Member States and NCAs have been working out how to treat crowdfunding, with some dealing with issues case-by-case, some seeking to clarify how crowdfunding fits into existing rules and others introducing specific requirements.To assist NCAs and market participants, and to promote regulatory and supervisory convergence, ESMA has assessed typical investment-based crowdfunding business models and how they could evolve, risks typically involved for project owners, investors and the platforms themselves and the likely components of an appropriate regulatory regime. ESMA then prepared a detailed analysis of how the typical business models map across to the existing EU legislation, set out in this document.

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