ESMA LIBRARY

The ESMA Library contains all ESMA documents. Please use the search and filter options to find specific documents.
297
DOCUMENTS

REFINE YOUR SEARCH

Sections

Type of document

Your filters
International cooperation X Innovation and Products X Joint Committee X
Reset all filters

Pages

Date Ref. Title Section Type Download Info Summary Related Documents Translated versions
04/01/2011 10-1541 3L3 Committees Joint Letter on the European Commission’s Green Paper on Audit: Lessons learnt from the Crisis , Letter PDF
144.8 KB
04/01/2011 10-1541 Annex 1 3L3 Committees Joint Letter on the European Commission’s Green Paper on Audit: Lessons learnt from the Crisis- CESR annex , Letter PDF
159.33 KB
04/01/2011 10-1541 Annex 2 3L3 Committees Joint Letter on the European Commission’s Green Paper on Audit: Lessons learnt from the Crisis- CEBS annex , Letter PDF
120.57 KB
04/01/2011 10-1541 Annex 3 3L3 Committees Joint Letter on the European Commission’s Green Paper on Audit: Lessons learnt from the Crisis- CEIOPS annex , Letter PDF
87.69 KB
15/03/2018 15-03-2018 Big Data Factsheet Reference PDF
750.34 KB
bgcsdadeelesetfifrhrhuitltlvmtnlplptroskslsv
15/03/2018 15-3-18 ESAs weigh benefits and risks of Big Data , Press Release PDF
20.5 KB
19/07/2012 2011/454 MOU on the supervision of CRAs- ESMA and ASIC , Reference PDF
4 MB
This document contains two copies of the MOU, signed by ESMA and by the ASIC.
19/07/2012 2012/124 MOU on the supervision of CRAs- ESMA and MAS , Reference PDF
574.14 KB
16/11/2012 2012/752 Call for expressions of interest: Consultative Working Group for ESMA’s Financial Innovation Standing Committee Reference PDF
141.98 KB
To apply, please use the below Application form
12/04/2013 2013-04-12 JC Report on Risks and Vulnerabilities in the European Union’s (EU) Financial System Press Release PDF
195.24 KB
  The Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (Joint Committee) has published today its first Report on Risks and Vulnerabilities in the European Union’s (EU) Financial System. Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities calls for action on cross-sectoral risks. • First report by the Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) on cross-sectoral risks facing the EU financial system; • Key risks facing EU financial markets include weak macroeconomic outlook; low interest rate environment; risk of further fragmentation on the single market; increased reliance on collateral; the quality of financial institutions’ assets; lack of confidence in financial institutions’ balance sheet valuations and risk disclosure; loss of confidence in financial benchmarks; • The ESAs have closely monitored the situation in Cyprus as it has developed. The events will lead to losses throughout the financial sector in Cyprus. However, the risks of direct international contagion seem to be limited.
05/09/2013 2013-09-03 Joint Committee Report on Risks and Vulnerabilities Press Release PDF
179.21 KB
13/11/2013 2013/1561 Review of the European System on Financial Supervision (ESFS) Letter PDF
141.48 KB
18/07/2013 2013/992 ESMA finalises supervisory co-operation agreements for alternative investment , , Press Release PDF
167.72 KB
18/07/2013 2013/998 Guidelines on the model MoU concerning consultation, cooperation and the exchange of information related to the supervision of AIFMD entities , Guidelines & Recommendations PDF
245.15 KB

ESMA finalises supervisory co-operation agreements for alternative investment funds The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has approved seven co-operation arrangements between EU securities regulators and their global counterparts with responsibility for the supervision of alternative investment funds, including hedge funds, private equity and real estate funds. ESMA’s Board of Supervisors, at its July meeting, approved Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) with authorities from the Bahamas, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico and the United States, including the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). ESMA has now negotiated 38 agreements on behalf of the 31 EU/EEA national competent authorities for securities markets supervision. The co-operation agreements allow for the exchange of information, cross-border on-site visits and mutual assistance in the enforcement of respective supervisory laws. ESMA had approved 31 MoUs with other non-EU regulators in May. The agreements cover third-country alternative investment fund managers (AIFMs) that market alternative investment funds (AIFs) in the EU and EU AIFMs that manage or market AIFs outside the EU. The agreements also cover co-operation in the cross-border supervision of depositaries and AIFMs’ delegates. National securities regulators in the EU, as the supervisors of AIFMs, are in the process of signing MoUs with those jurisdictions relevant to their market. The existence of co-operation arrangements between the EU and non-EU authorities is a precondition of the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (AIFMD) for allowing managers from third countries access to EU markets or to perform fund management by delegation from EU managers by 22 July 2013. The co-operation arrangements are applicable from 22 July, and will enable cross-border marketing of AIFs to professional investors between jurisdictions. This is subject to the non-EU jurisdiction not being listed as a non-cooperative jurisdiction by the Financial Action Task Force and, as from the entry into force of the passport for non-EU managers, having co-operation agreements in place with EU Member States regarding the exchange of information on tax matters. The content of the ESMA MoUs follow the IOSCO Principles on Cross-Border Supervisory Co-operation of 2010, and complements the terms and conditions of the IOSCO Multilateral MoU Concerning Consultation and Co-operation and the Exchange of Information of 2002 (MMoU). ESMA had originally contacted all the authorities that have signed the IOSCO MMoU of 2002. ESMA has now approved MoUs with those 42 authorities that responded to ESMA’s call. ESMA continues to negotiate the MoU with the Chinese authority.   Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) MoU with AFSA (Albania) MoU with ASIC (Australia) MoU with BMA (Bermuda) MoU with Canadian authorities  Accompanying letter MoU with CDVM (Morocco) MoU with CFTC (US) Accompanying letter MoU with CIMA (Cayman Islands) MoU with CMA (Kenya) MoU with CMSA (Tanzania) MoU with CNBV (Mexico) MoU with CVM (Brazil) MoU with DFSA (Dubai) MoU with FCSM (Mauritius) MoU with FINMA (Switzerland) MoU with FSA (Labuan) MoU with FSC (BVI) MoU with FSC (Guernsey) MoU with FSC (Isle of Man) MoU with FSC (Jersey) MoU with HKMA (Hong Kong) MoU with ISA (Israel) MoU with JFSA (Japan) MoU with MAFF (Japan) MoU with MAS (Singapore) MoU with METI (Japan) MoU with OCC and FED (US) MoU with OSFI (Canada) MoU with SC (Malaysia) MoU with SC (Republic of Srpska) MoU with SC (The Bahamas) MoU with SCA (UAE) MoU with SEBI (India) MoU with SEC (Montenegro) MoU with SEC (Pakistan) MoU with SEC (Thailand) MoU with SEC Macedonia (FYROM) MoU with SFC (Hong Kong) MoU with US SEC Accompanying letter   MoU with EFSA (Egypt)   MoU with FMA (New Zealand)   MoU with FSB (South Africa)   MoU with SSC (Vietnam)   MoU with FSC and FSS (South Korea)

18/06/2014 2014 Joint ESA Consumer Protection Day- Programme , Reference PDF
229.12 KB
22/09/2014 2014-063 (Annex) EU Supervisory Authorities update on risks in EU financial system , Press Release PDF
210.06 KB
The Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) published today its bi-annual report on risks and vulnerabilities in the European Union's (EU) financial system. The report identifies a number of risks to financial stability in the EU, including prolonged weak economic growth in an environment characterised by high indebtedness, intensified search for yield in a protracted low interest rate environment, and uncertainties in global emerging market economies. The report also highlights risks related to conduct of business and Information Technologies (IT). Press Queries - European Banking Authority Press Office +44 (0) 207 382 1772 or press@eba.europa.eu
06/11/2014 2014-41 ESA’s budget 2015 – ensuring safe financial markets Letter PDF
91.5 KB
The European Supervisory Authorities - European Banking Authority (EBA), European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA), European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) - have written to the President of the Economic and Financial Affairs Council (ECOFIN) on their concerns regarding the budget negotiations for the 2015 EU budget and the budgetary constraints of the ESAs.
18/11/2014 2014/1371 Call for expressions of interest: Consultative Working Group for ESMA’s Financial Innovation Standing Committee Reference PDF
210.41 KB
ESMA today launches a process to renew the composition of the Consultative Working Group (‘CWG’) for the Financial Innovation Standing Committee (’FISC’). ESMA is therefore calling for expressions of interest from stakeholders. Application procedure, closing date Relevant stakeholders meeting the required selection criteria and wishing to apply for a position on the CWG are invited to submit, in English: a completed application form (see separate document), and a detailed curriculum vitae (CV), preferably in the EU CV format - the link to the template for this is: http://europass.cedefop.europa.eu/europass/home/hornav/Downloads/Europas... It is optional for applicants to attach a motivation letter (2 pages maximum). Unclear or incomplete applications will not be considered. Applications must be submitted by email using the application form by no later than 31 December 2014 to the following email addresses: patrick.armstrong@esma.europa.eu and anne.chone@esma.europa.eu.
18/12/2014 2014/1378 Opinion- Investment-based crowdfunding Opinion PDF
460.92 KB
Crowdfunding is a means of raising finance for projects from ‘the crowd’ often by means of an internet-based platform through which project owners ‘pitch’ their idea to potential backers, who are typically not professional investors.  It takes many forms, not all of which involve the potential for a financial return.  ESMA’s focus is on crowdfunding which involves investment, as distinct from donation, non-monetary reward or loan agreement.  Crowdfunding is relatively young and business models are evolving. EU financial services rules were not designed with the industry in mind. Within investment-based crowdfunding a range of different operational structures are used so it is not straightforward to map crowdfunding platforms’ activities to those regulated under EU legislation. Member States and NCAs have been working out how to treat crowdfunding, with some dealing with issues case-by-case, some seeking to clarify how crowdfunding fits into existing rules and others introducing specific requirements.To assist NCAs and market participants, and to promote regulatory and supervisory convergence, ESMA has assessed typical investment-based crowdfunding business models and how they could evolve, risks typically involved for project owners, investors and the platforms themselves and the likely components of an appropriate regulatory regime. ESMA then prepared a detailed analysis of how the typical business models map across to the existing EU legislation, set out in this document.
18/12/2014 2014/1560 Advice- Investment-based crowdfunding Final Report PDF
482.2 KB
Crowdfunding is a means of raising finance for projects from ‘the crowd’ often by means of an internet-based platform through which project owners ‘pitch’ their idea to potential backers, who are typically not professional investors.  It takes many forms, not all of which involve the potential for a financial return.  ESMA’s focus is on crowdfunding which involves investment, as distinct from donation, non-monetary reward or loan agreement.Crowdfunding is relatively young and business models are evolving. EU financial services rules were not designed with the industry in mind.  Within investment-based crowdfunding a range of different operational structures are used so it is not straightforward to map crowdfunding platforms’ activities to those regulated under EU legislation. Member States and NCAs have been working out how to treat crowdfunding, with some dealing with issues case-by-case, some seeking to clarify how crowdfunding fits into existing rules and others introducing specific requirements.To assist NCAs and market participants, and to promote regulatory and supervisory convergence, ESMA has assessed typical investment-based crowdfunding business models and how they could evolve, risks typically involved for project owners, investors and the platforms themselves and the likely components of an appropriate regulatory regime. ESMA then prepared a detailed analysis of how the typical business models map across to the existing EU legislation, set out in sections 1 to 6 of this document.

Pages