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Date Ref. Title Section Type Download Info Summary Related Documents Translated versions
01/10/2020 ESMA80-187-610 BMR Brexit Public Statement 2020 Q4 , Statement PDF
82.97 KB
09/04/2020 ESMA80-187-546 Actions to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on the EU financial markets regarding the timeliness of fulfilling external audit requirements for interest rate benchmarks under the Benchmarks Regulation , Statement PDF
89.31 KB
11/12/2019 ESMA70-145-114 Q&A on the Benchmarks Regulation (BMR) , Q&A PDF
518.18 KB
07/10/2019 ESMA70-155-8500 Impact of no-deal Brexit on the application of MiFID II/MiFIR and the Benchmark Regulation (BMR) , , Statement PDF
140.47 KB
07/10/2019 ESMA90-1-167 Update on the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union- preparations for a possible no-deal Brexit scenario on 31 October 2019 , , , Statement PDF
179.84 KB
20/12/2018 ESMA70-145-1008 Final report on Guidelines on non-significant benchmarks Final Report PDF
673.72 KB
23/05/2018 ESMA71-99-979 ESMA appoints new chair to its Committee of Economic and Markets’ Analysis , Statement PDF
209.05 KB
15/03/2018 JC-2018-04 Joint Committee Final Report on Big Data Final Report PDF
520.31 KB
13/03/2018 ESMA70-143-30 First meeting of the Euro Risk Free Rate Working Group – Steven Maijoor concluding remarks Statement PDF
154.5 KB
13/11/2017 ESMA50-157-828 ESMA alerts firms involved in Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) to the need to meet relevant regulatory requirements , Statement PDF
330.73 KB
13/11/2017 ESMA50-157-829 ESMA alerts investors to the high risks of Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) , Statement PDF
444.01 KB
29/09/2017 ESMA71-99-602 ESMA appoints new chairs to Standing Committees , , , , , , , Statement PDF
143.69 KB
28/06/2017 ESMA35-36-885 Product Intervention- General Statement , Statement PDF
123.04 KB

This statement provides an update on the European Securities and Markets Authority’s (ESMA) work in relation to the sale of contracts for differences (CFDs), binary options and other speculative products to retail investors.

 

ESMA has been concerned about the provision of speculative products such as CFDs, rolling spot forex and binary options to retail investors for a considerable period of time and has conducted ongoing monitoring and supervisory convergence work in this area. In this context, ESMA has previously published a number of Q&As on CFDs and other speculative products[1] to foster supervisory convergence, having established a CFD Task Force in July 2015, and also issued a further investor warning on the sale of CFDs, binary options and other speculative products in July 2016[2].

 

However, ESMA remains concerned that these supervisory convergence tools may not be sufficiently effective to ensure that the risks to consumer protection are sufficiently controlled or reduced. ESMA is therefore discussing the possible use of its product intervention powers under Article 40 of MiFIR to address investor protection risks in relation to CFDs, rolling spot forex and binary options.

 

ESMA is in the process of discussing the possible use of its product intervention powers under Article 40 of MiFIR, the possible content of any such measures, and how they could be applied. However, ESMA can confirm that the measures being discussed for (i) CFDs and rolling spot forex and (ii) binary options include proposals that take into account a number of measures that have been adopted or publicly consulted on by EU National Competent Authorities. These measures include leverage limits, guaranteed limits on client losses, and / or restrictions on the marketing and distribution of these products.

 

In accordance with Article 40 of MiFIR, any intervention measures must be approved by the ESMA Board of Supervisors and can only come into effect from 3 January 2018 at the earliest[3].

02/06/2017 ESMA70-145-81 Final report on draft RTS on cooperation with third countries under BMR Final Report PDF
203.07 KB
07/03/2017 ESMA50-1623096732-432x Closing remarks Financial Innovation Day Statement PDF
152.27 KB
07/03/2017 ESMA50-1623096732-432 Opening remarks Financial Innovation Day Statement PDF
169.02 KB
10/11/2016 2016-1560 Final Report on Technical Advice under the Benchmarks Regulation Final Report PDF
943.42 KB
01/07/2015 2015/1005 Questions and Answers: Investment-based crowdfunding: money laundering/terrorist financing Q&A PDF
157.73 KB
21/05/2015 2015/856 Ann1 Investment-based crowdfunding- Insights from regulators in the EU Final Report PDF
319.65 KB
18/12/2014 2014/1560 Advice- Investment-based crowdfunding Final Report PDF
482.2 KB
Crowdfunding is a means of raising finance for projects from ‘the crowd’ often by means of an internet-based platform through which project owners ‘pitch’ their idea to potential backers, who are typically not professional investors.  It takes many forms, not all of which involve the potential for a financial return.  ESMA’s focus is on crowdfunding which involves investment, as distinct from donation, non-monetary reward or loan agreement.Crowdfunding is relatively young and business models are evolving. EU financial services rules were not designed with the industry in mind.  Within investment-based crowdfunding a range of different operational structures are used so it is not straightforward to map crowdfunding platforms’ activities to those regulated under EU legislation. Member States and NCAs have been working out how to treat crowdfunding, with some dealing with issues case-by-case, some seeking to clarify how crowdfunding fits into existing rules and others introducing specific requirements.To assist NCAs and market participants, and to promote regulatory and supervisory convergence, ESMA has assessed typical investment-based crowdfunding business models and how they could evolve, risks typically involved for project owners, investors and the platforms themselves and the likely components of an appropriate regulatory regime. ESMA then prepared a detailed analysis of how the typical business models map across to the existing EU legislation, set out in sections 1 to 6 of this document.